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Welcome-To-Skills-For-Life

Corporate branding research has established that Lifeline has a 96% brand recognition, much of which has been earned from the 24/7 Lifeline Telephone Crisis Support Service 131114, and our recycle shops. Another strong component of Lifeline's place in the Australian community is specialised training, not only the training course to join our crisis telephone support service, but also the suite of skills-for-life-training programs.

Our agency’s twin missions of providing skills in crisis support and suicide prevention, alongside strategies to care-for-carers, are woven into our highly complementary range of deliverables. Being skilled to acutely and astutely listen to someone (ACCIDENTAL COUNSELLOR FOUNDATIONS) may enable a frontline worker or caregiver to better recognise domestic violence (DV-ALERT, DV-AWARE), a mental health problem (MENTAL HEALTH FIRST AID), or risk of suicide (safeTALK, MIND YOUR MATES, ASIST), all the while being mindful of self-care (CREATIVE THERAPY TOOLS, mindfulness @ work). That is the reason this range of training is dubbed skills-for-life.

Unlike other training, this type of participation keeps on giving well after completion of the workshop.
As one participant told us, “I have been to everything you have to offer. Can’t get enough of what you do.

Accidental Counsellor Foundations
Basic Skills For Dealing With People in Crisis

Ever had to step into the shoes of The Accidental Counsellor?

The Accidental Counsellor Workshop will provide you with necessary skills and tools to be able to step into the shoes of an accidental counsellor momentarily, respond appropriately, efficiently and effectively to people in crisis or distress when there may not be a professional immediately available.

In community services work, we may often be the first point of contact for someone in crisis needing immediate assistance. Even without a formal qualification in counselling, a toolbox of counselling techniques and questioning frameworks provides the necessary support to clients when they are anxious, angry, experiencing loss or in a challenging time in their life.

Participants gain a greater understanding of how to communicate more effectively and learn strategies to help foster effective and trusting relationships with clients or peers. In this workshop, we ask participants to reflect on personal values and beliefs and how they influence interactions with clients. How you respond will create an impact on the person in need of support or assistance and often determine the outcome of your interactions. The workshop is flexible and interactive, encouraging participants to ask questions, share their experiences, practise skills and engage in self-reflection.

2 Day Workshop

  • Module 1 The Accidental Counsellor
  • Module 2 Barriers to listening
  • Module 3 Values and beliefs
  • Module 4 Understanding emotional crisis
  • Module 5 Understanding conflict
  • Module 6 Dealing with behaviours of concern
  • Module 7 Professional boundaries
  • Module 8 Self-care

1 Day Condensed Workshop

If you can’t take 2 days to attend the extended version, you need not miss out!

Our 1-day condensed workshop is an abbreviated version of our telephone crisis support training and covers active listening skills, communication techniques and so much more.

  Workshop Outcomes

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Differentiate between effective communication and counselling
  • Gain toolbox of counselling techniques
  • Communicate more effectively
  • Adopt questioning frameworks
  • Recognise someone in crisis needing immediate assistance
  • Support clients when they are anxious, angry or using challenging behaviour
  • Reflect on personal values and beliefs and how they can get in the way of good listening
  • Be ethical when dealing with sensitive information
  • Be able to set boundaries and limits yet still maintain an appropriate level of involvement
  • Appreciate the importance of debriefing and caring-for-you-as-carer after emotionally-charged interactions
  • Share experiences, practise skills and engage in self-reflection
View available dates on the Training Calendar
Creative Therapy Tools


Art of Wellbeing: Creative Therapy Tools for Educators amd Service Providers

The potential for creative expression is a long-proven path to expanding people’s capacity for responding to life challenges and the desire for meaningful living. How then do we take an intentional and holistic approach to meeting individuals through this creative modality, to promote healthy self-awareness, authenticity of character, social integrity and the ability to handle mental health and wellbeing challenges? Based on her Transpersonal Art Therapy work with schools and community service providers, Naomi Wild delivers this 1-day train-the-trainer (T4T) workshop for those supporting others. Learn about creative processes, meditation techniques and group dynamics, as well as a foundation in understanding the principles and outcomes of incorporating transpersonal art therapy into your skillset when working with others.

Meet the Trainer

Naomi Wild is a qualified transpersonal art therapist and practising artist. She uses creative techniques to engage people in enhancing their capacity as whole people – personally. Her desire is to equip participants with tools to enable them to connect with themselves and others, meaningfully and sustainability. Her community-minded philosophy has enables her to reach a diverse range of groups and issues including personal wellbeing, family, relationships, mental health and domestic violence. 

DV-alert Workshop

DV-alert (Domestic Violence Response Training)
CHCDFV001 - Recognise and Respond to Domestic and Family Violence

Lifeline Newcastle and Hunter on behalf of Lifeline Australia RTO 88036 delivers DV-alert, Lifeline's free nationally recognised training program that enables health, allied health and frontline workers to confidently:

  • RECOGNISE signs of domestic and family violence
  • RESPOND with appropriate care
  • REFER affected individuals and families to relevant support services

Since 2007, Lifeline has been delivering DV-alert (previously known as DiVeRT) in different parts of Australia including remote and rural locations. Since it was first developed, DV-alert has expanded to wider range of audiences to provide a more tailored approach that recognises the complexities of domestic and family violence as an issue.

DV-alert is funded by the Department of Social Services and is supported to contribute to one of the outcomes of the National Plan to Reduce Violence Against Women and their Children 2010-2022 - services meet the needs of women and children experiencing domestic and family violence.

NATIONALLY RECOGNISED TRAINING:

As a nationally recognised training program, DV-alert is mapped out against the unit of competency CCHCDFV001 - Recognise and Respond to Domestic and Family Violence. Participants who complete the training and assessment will receive a statement of attainment. Find out more about the benefits of DV-alert.

For more detailed information and for bookings, visit dvalert.org.au

View available dates on the DV-alert website

LivingWorks ASIST

Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training

LivingWorks Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) aims to enhance a caregiver’s abilities to help a person at risk avoid suicide. Participants learn to recognise when someone may be at risk of suicide and respond in ways that help increase immediate safety and link the person to help.

Key Features

ASIST facilitates involvement. Participants will spend over half of the workshop in the same small group with one of the two trainers. Learning is stimulated by audiovisuals and teaching. A suicide first aid model provides the framework for the workshop and skills practise.

The workshop provides opportunities to learn what a person at risk may need from others in order to keep safe and get more help. Participants consider common factors that may flag potential suicide risk.

ASIST has a training focus. Personal and professional experiences that participants bring contribute to everyone’s learning. Experiences with suicide and intervention are focused on the overall learning goal—to provide suicide first aid.

Participants are also encouraged to share and reflect on their attitudes about suicide and suicide intervention and hear those of others. People are invited to reflect on how these attitudes may affect their caregiver role with a person at risk and to appreciate diverse perspectives. The workshop encourages honest, open and direct talk about suicide as part of preparing people to provide suicide first aid.

LivingWorks Australia

Participants are also encouraged to share and reflect on their attitudes about suicide and suicide intervention and hear those of others. People are invited to reflect on how these attitudes may affect their caregiver role with a person at risk and to appreciate diverse perspectives. The workshop encourages honest, open and direct talk about suicide as part of preparing people to provide suicide first aid.

Although it is highly standardised, ASIST has been used in a range of settings with trainees from a variety of backgrounds and countries. ASIST has been implemented in secondary and post-secondary schools, mental health centres, hospitals, social services, public safety agencies and numerous other community settings.

Evaluations of ASIST outcomes have shown that participants demonstrate increased intervention skills, and that ASIST training has led to positive changes in both knowledge and attitudes.

ASIST is based on principles of adult learning. It values the experiences and contributions that participants bring and encourages people to share actively in the learning process.

Lifeline Newcastle & Hunter conducts at least one ASIST workshop in the region each month.

View available dates on the Training Calendar
LivingWorks safeTALK

Suicide Prevention Awareness Program

LivingWorks safeTALK is a half-day presentation to increase suicide awareness. This program alerts community members to signs that a person may be considering suicide. It acknowledges that while most people at risk of suicide signal their distress and invite help, these intervention opportunities are often overlooked. safeTALK participants learn to recognise when someone may have thoughts of suicide and to respond in ways that link them with further suicide intervention help.

Suicide alert helpers contribute to a suicide safer community. It is intended that safeTALK participants will be better prepared to:

  • Recognise that invitations to help are often overlooked
  • Move beyond common tendencies to miss, dismiss and avoid conversations around suicide
  • Notice and respond to situations in which thoughts of suicide may be present
  • Apply basic TALK steps (Tell, Ask, Listen, and KeepSafe)
  • Connect the person with thoughts of suicide to suicide first aid help and further community resources

Suicide alert community members are better prepared to become a vital link in connecting people at risk with further help. safeTALK is designed to complement the LivingWorks ASIST workshop (Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training). The programs share the same beliefs about suicide and preventing suicide. However, each presentation has a specific role.

safeTALK Outline

safeTALK is a brief program that shows how alertness to suicide risk can be followed by basic (TALK) steps that facilitate links with further suicide first aid help. The emphasis is on fulfilling this vital linking role with community resources rather than full engagement in a suicide first aid intervention.

safeTALK is a presentation rather than workshop format. It will stimulate people to think and hopefully act differently when signs of potential suicide risk are present.

Some organisations may choose to train a large number of people in safeTALK, while inviting key people, designated as suicide first aid resource persons, to attend a LivingWorks ASIST workshop.

Call Dr June Anderson for bookings, 02 4940 2000.

Mental Health First Aid

Mental Health First Aid Training

Mental health first aid is the help given to someone dealing with a mental health problem or in a mental health crisis until appropriate professional treatment is received or until the crisis resolves. Participants learn the signs and symptoms of depression, anxiety, bi-polar disorder, schizophrenia, psychotic disorders, non-suicidal self-injury and substance use disorder. They also learn where and how to get help and what sort of help has been shown by research to be effective.

Blended Mental Health First Aid Training

The Blended Mental Health First Aid Course is a combination of online (eLearning) and a half day of follow-on face-to-face training. The face-to-face component must be done within 3 months of completing the eLearning component. Course participants first complete the interactive self-paced eLearning component that teaches them about mental health problems, mental health crises and skills to offer initial help to an adult developing a mental health problem or in a mental health crisis. The follow-on face-to-face session allows participants the opportunity to revise and consolidate knowledge and skills in a group environment, and to apply their skills to specific scenarios. After completing both steps, participants are eligible to complete a short 20 question online exam in order to receive a Mental Health First Aider Certificate of Accreditation valid for 3 years.

Youth Mental Health First Aid Training

The Youth Mental Health First Aid Course is for adults working or living with those aged between 12 and 18 years, and is particularly suitable for parents, teachers, sports coaches, and youth workers. The course teaches adults how to assist adolescents who are developing a mental health problem or in a mental health crisis. Course participants learn about adolescent development, the signs and symptoms of the common and disabling mental health problems in young people, where and how to get help when a young person is developing a mental illness, what sort of help has been shown by research to be effective, and how to provide first aid in a crisis situation.

Who can attend an MHFA course?

Any interested adult can attend. This course is not a therapy or support group, rather it is an education course. The program has been well evaluated and found to be effective in improving mental health literacy, reducing stigma and increasing helping behaviours. Our instructors are trained by Mental Health First Aid TM Australia.

The Standard Mental Health First Aid Course has also been endorsed for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Points for a number of professions. This includes nurses, pharmacists, fitness instructors, social workers, physiotherapists and others.

MHFA Training can provide members of the community with:

  • Skills in how to recognise the signs and symptoms of mental health problems
  • Knowledge of the possible causes or risk factors for these mental health problems
  • Awareness of the evidenced based medical, psychological and alternative treatments available
  • Skills in how to give appropriate initial help and support someone experiencing a mental health problem
  • Skills in how to take appropriate action if a crisis situation arises involving suicidal behaviour, panic attack, overdose or threatening psychotic behaviour

How is the course delivered?

This training is licensed to Mental Health First Aid (read more on www.mhfa.com.au) MHFA allows for three different delivery modes: as a two-consecutive-day workshop; as two non-consecutive separate days; or as four 3-hour sessions spaced apart. Whichever mode is chosen, the course needs to be delivered completely for participants to receive their Certificate of Completion (worth 20 PDE points for most organisations and the near-equivalent of a VET Unit of Competency for a Cert IV/Diploma in Community Studies).


View available dates on the Training Calendar
Mind Your Mates Program

Recognising the signs of suicide

"We need to overcome the silence in the community around suicide and be responsive to the early warning signs of suicide among family and friends, school and work colleagues, by strengthening people's awareness and ability to take action."

Harden up. Suck it up. Man up. We’ve been telling our men this for years, but is it healthy? Suicide is now the leading cause of death for Australian men aged 15-44. And alarming new research suggests that some men choose to take their own life, rather than appear weak by asking for help. 

Mind Your Mates is a 1-hour presentation—what we call a toolbox tool—to bring awareness around mental health issues and the recognisable signs that suicide might be on someone’s mind. We need to know, we need to be real and open to someone being able to voice emotions around mental health issues. Not just men, of course, but especially men.

Most men like to think of themselves as being “a good mate” to their friends, but what does that actually mean today? There’s some obvious traits; never bailing on a shout and helping your mates move house. 

But then there’s the biggie. The number one thing you’re meant to be able to offer your mates – support when they need it. Aussie men excel at the day to day of mateship, but often aren’t there to lend a hand when a friend is doing it tough emotionally, because they don’t know their mate needs help. 

 Our image of masculinity has been defined by physical toughness, self-reliance and emotional stoicism. When you have a problem, you just “deal with it”. This tendency to bottle everything up has contributed to a rise in men’s mental health issues and, alarmingly, five men taking their lives every day in Australia. So many lives tragically cut short because we’ve been taught that “real men” don’t ask for help.  

But across Australia, we are starting to change this outdated view of masculinity. And the charge is being lead by some of the most blokey industries, helping to knock down emotional walls to improve men’s mental health.  

It was the actions of the Diggers in WWI that cemented mateship as a defining Australian characteristic. This same bond – mateship – is now helping Australia fight a national mental health crisis. The enemy might not be as easy to see, but this battle claims the lives of over two-thousand Australian men every year, so if you think you have a mate who might need support, make sure you reach out and offer yours. It’s what mates do. 

 Source: adapted from http://manup.org.au 

Our trainers come to your workplace when you book a Mind Your Mates presentation 

Call Dr June Anderson for bookings, 02 4940 2000.

mindfulness@work

mindfulness@work

The ancient wisdom behind mindfulness combines with the latest research on neuroplasticity and thinking from leaders in the business world. Clearer thinking, the ability to make calm, considered decisions and freedom from feeling overwhelmed by a seemingly never-ending workload are just some of the benefits that a practice of mindfulness can bring to the workplace.

Forward-thinking people in business and institutions are becoming increasingly aware of the benefits of mindfulness training. According to the psychologist Daniel Goleman, being mindful “is now the yardstick by which pioneering organisations and their leaders are being judged. Today’s leaders not only have to be emotionally intelligent, but also mindful.”

Mindfulness training supports the development of a more effective, productive, creative and peaceful workplace and dramatically reduces levels of stress in the work environment. Stress is believed to trigger 70% of visits to the doctor and 85% of serious illnesses. Thus, when you consider that stress in the workplace reduces productivity, increases management pressure, severely restricts workers’ creativity and interferes with job satisfaction, investing in mindfulness training could be one of the most cost effective decisions you make all year.

“Based on the 2,600 year-old tradition of Buddhist meditation, mindfulness is not new or New Age. What is new is bringing its potential to the offices and conference rooms of businesses and corporations.” Pamela Weiss, Founder of Appropriate Response 2012.

Mindfulness coach Charlotte Thaarup gives you the foundation for starting to integrate mindfulness into work life. You will also gain specific skills to train attention span, calm down and reduce being overwhelmed, as well as practical mindful skills for running meetings, emailing and time (self) management.

Call Dr June Anderson for bookings, 02 4940 2000 or book and pay online.

View available dates on the Training Calendar
Refund Policy

Lifeline Training Cancellation and Refund Policy

For an individual participant who has paid a course fee, if cancellation is made more than 48 hours before course commencement, a refund will be made less a 20% administration fee. If a training participant can provide a medical certificate or show extreme personal or other hardship that necessitates withdrawal 48 hours or less before course commencement, a refund will be made less a 20% administration fee. Alternatively, we can roll your registration over to the next available workshop of the same deliverable, once only. If the rollover registration was previously at an early bird special price and the postponed registration is a workshop at our normal price, the difference in price needs to be paid. If the rollover registration was previously at the normal price and the postponed registration is a workshop at an early bird special rate, the difference in price will not be refunded. If cancellation is made less than 48 hours before course commencement without such proof of illness or hardship, or the person booked does not attend, no refund will be made.

If Lifeline Newcastle & Hunter cancels a course for whatever reason, a full refund will be made or payment can be rolled over to the next available course on instruction.

In the case of a group booking of five or more participants for which a rate has been negotiated, if the booking is cancelled more than seven days but less than 14 days prior to commencement of the planned training, a 20% administration fee will be charged. If cancellation of a group or organisation booking of five or more participants is made less than seven days before course commencement, 50% of the negotiated rate will be charged.

Lifeline Shop Refunds

New Items
Please choose carefully. Lifeline Newcastle & Hunter does not give refunds if you simply change your mind or make a wrong decision. You can choose between a refund or exchange where goods are faulty, wrongly described, different from a sample shown to you or don't do what they are supposed to do. Please retain your receipt for proof of purchase.

Second-Hand Clothing and Goods
Whilst Lifeline Newcastle & Hunter endeavours to ensure that items sold in the eight Hunter-based Lifeline Shops are of merchantable quality, second-hand goods are classed as seconds and are therefore non-refundable.

Safety Planning & Response

For Frontline Workers

Safety Planning And Response (SPAR) is a 4-hour module that provides de-escalation training for frontline workers, combining elements of our Accidental Counsellor course content (Module 4 Understanding Conflict; Module 5 Dealing with Difficult Clients; and Module 6 Professional Boundaries and Self-Care) with additional components aligning with the VET sector.

The SPAR de-escalation toolbox supports VET Units of Competency CHCCOM403A Use targeted communication skills to build relationships, and HLTCSD306D Respond effectively to behaviours of concern, both units within, for instance, Cert IV in Social Housing. Topics covered include:

  • Alarm reaction and the stress cycle
  • De-escalation toolbox
  • Physical intervention and self-defense'
  • Positive behaviour support
  • Professional boundaries
  • The importance of self-care

SPAR has the capacity to be tailored to a specific workplace and is an ideal module to include in workplace health and safety training for those organisations that have workers in the field. Our trainers can come to you for groups of up 18.

About the Trainer

Belinda is a qualified social worker with over 6 years’ experience as a Child Protection Caseworker with NSW Family and Community Services, including 5 years’ experience as a Senior Case Worker with the Joint Investigation Response Team (Criminal Investigation Team). She was also a sworn Police Officer with the NSW Police Force for 5 years, with two years’ service as a Domestic Violence Liaison Officer. 

Belinda has also been a LivingWorks ASIST Trainer since 2012 and has delivered over 50 workshops to a variety of companies, organisations and community groups in both rural and urban centres around NSW as well as in China and Singapore. She qualified as a Consulting Trainer in 2015 and has been recognised as a Trainer of Excellence by LivingWorks Australia. .

Call Dr June Anderson for bookings, 02 4940 2000.

School Alert

A school approach to suicide prevention

Lifeline Newcastle & Hunter has developed the schoolALERT program to support high schools in their desire to ensure staff and parents are more suicide aware, alert and armed with response. Trained staff and parents will provide a safety net for vulnerable young people and be more confident to take action, protecting those in their care at risk of suicide.

The schoolALERT program provides the following training:

LivingWorks Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST)

Recommended for significant members of staff such as Year Heads, School Welfare or Guidance Officers. Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) is a two-day interactive workshop in suicide first aid, the verbal equivalent to physical first aid or CPR. Participants learn to recognise when someone may be at risk of suicide, to respond in ways that help increase their immediate safety, and to link them to further help. Participants consistently say that they feel better prepared to respond helpfully to a person at risk of suicide, and that ASIST training has led to positive changes in both knowledge and attitudes about suicide.

Living works safeTALK

Awareness program suited to all other staff members, parents and friends of the school. safeTALK is a half-day presentation to increase suicide alertness to signs that a person may be considering suicide. The program acknowledges that while most people at risk of suicide signal their distress and invite help, these intervention opportunities are often overlooked. Participants learn to recognise when someone may have thoughts of suicide and to respond in ways that link them with further suicide intervention help. Suicide alert helpers contribute to a suicide safer community.

“Our students will greatly benefit from the teachers and parents being more alert to the risk of suicide.”

Feedback from schoolALERT participant, St. Francis Xavier’s College

If you would like more information or to book a schoolALERT for your school, contact Robyn 02 4940 2000 or email robyn@lifelinehunter.org.au.

Suicide Safer Workplace

Workplace Mental Health and Safety

Increasingly, organisations are acknowledging that the 'H' in WH&S is not only about physical health. The mental health of employees is a significant consideration on not just their well-being but also on the company's bottom line. Employers are recognising that mental health problems reduce performance and lead to increased absenteeism. Having a mental health savvy workforce or, as one of our toolbox programs is called, the ability to Mind Your Mates, builds stronger workplace wellbeing and employer reputation.

Our multi-modal training in mental health awareness and suicide prevention training can be adapted to suit most workplaces. Members of our training team can come to you and, when a client based in the Hunter has branch offices outside the region and wants whole-of-organisation training, we can travel to meet that need.

Such was the case with Emeco, an organisation that provides earth moving equipment to mining companies and contractors in three regions: the Hunter, Mackay and Perth. Emeco is also an organisation with a strong sense of corporate social responsibility. In September 2011, when Lifeline invested in a 'Saving Lives Overnight' pilot program, Emeco underwrote the payment of telephone crisis supporters to work the midnight to 6am shift, bringing greater sustainability to the way Lifeline recruits, trains and retains staff and volunteers.

Not only does Emeco's management 'talk the talk' about suicide prevention, but also 'walks the walk'. Emeco's workforce is 83.5% male, and we know that men are four times more likely to die from suicide than women. Most of Emeco's workers also live in remote and regional areas, and we know that suicide rates are higher there than in metropolitan areas. In recognition of these combined risk factors, and in alignment with the corporate funding pledge to Lifeline, Emeco commissioned a multi-modal suicide-safer education program for staff in Emeco's three centres - Rutherford, Perth and Mackay - delivered by members of Lifeline Newcastle & Hunter's training division March-May 2013.

View available dates on the Training Calendar
Training calendar for workshop dates

View available course dates and book online. 

For more information or for corporate group bookings, contact Dr June Anderson, 4940 2000 or email june@lifelinehunter.org.au 

View Training Calendar

Information on Suicide Prevention in the Workplace

Workplaces often represent the last crucible of sustained human contact for many of the people who kill themselves or self-harm each year. A co-worker's suicide has a deep, disturbing impact on work mates. For managers, such tragedies pose challenges not covered in management school. Lifeline Newcastle & Hunter offers tailor-made packages for workplaces keen to embrace a proactive suicide prevention stance in alignment with Workplace (Mental) Health and Safety principles.

While our agency is relatively small, we have contributed significantly to large organisations as a boutique training provider, specialising in mental health awareness and suicide prevention training. Increasingly, organisations are acknowledging that the 'H' in WH&S is not only about physical health. The mental health of employees is a significant consideration on not just their wellbeing but also on the company's bottom line. Employers are recognising that mental health problems reduce performance and lead to increased absenteeism. Having a mental health savvy workforce or, as one of our toolbox programs is called, the ability to Mind Your Mates, builds stronger workplace wellbeing and employer reputation. A multi-modal approach is recommended using a mix of safeTALK, ASIST and Accidental Counsellor or, in the mining industry, Mind Your Mates toolbox talks.

If you are an employer, manager or supervisor, please call Dr June Anderson, Manager Training and Development on 02 4940 2000, to talk over how our multi-modal training in mental health awareness and suicide prevention training can be adapted to suit your workplace. Members of our training team can come to you and, when a client based in the Hunter has branch offices outside the region and wants whole-of-organisation training, we can travel to meet that need.

Our Good News Story

Suicide Prevention Australia (SPA) is the national peak body for the suicide prevention sector in Australia, promoting collaboration, coordination and partnerships in suicide prevention, intervention and postvention. It's mission is to make suicide prevention everybody's business.

Each year at SPA's annual conference, eight LiFE Awards are bestowed on individuals or organisations who have been actively involved in the practice of suicide prevention, intervention or postvention; exhibited innovation for positive change in the suicide prevention sector; and promoted advocacy and contributed to an increased awareness in the community about suicide prevention.

In 2013, Lifeline Newcastle & Hunter received the LiFE Service Delivery Award for our services in community and crisis support. This award recognises the quality of service, innovation in delivery of service, and distinguishable results produced.

Testimonials

After attending a LivingWorks safeTALK training session, two participants chanced upon a young person in a very agitated and distressed state. They used the suicide prevention skills that they had only just learned to respond to this young person. An ambulance was called and safety was provided. The next day it was confirmed that the young person was planning to suicide before the life saving intervention. The care shown by the two safeTALKers who kept the person at risk safe is powerful testimony that this training can save lives.

A representative of a church-based school had been petitioning staff and parents to conduct dedicated suicide prevention training for the school's parents and teachers following the (then) recent suicide of one of the school's pupils. Staff had been reluctant to break the taboo of talking about suicide. Said the caller asking for Lifeline's help in her petition, "I know how good this program is. I have done ASIST myself, and it was because of that I was able to help my sister. She is alive today because I did that workshop."

Our Area of Service
Lifeline Hunter Region

The Lifeline Newcastle & Hunter Training Division serves the Statistical District of Hunter, an area of 29,000 sq. kms with a population of 651,000 people. When a client based in the Hunter has branch offices outside the region and wants whole-of-organisation training, we can travel to meet that need.

Help us Help Those in Need

Lifeline Hunter Central Coast is 55% self-funded and your support is vital in helping us continue to offer crisis support, counselling, and suicide prevention programs within our region.

Your Donation Will Help Us Save Over 5000 Lives A Year.

Client / Participant Testimonials

  • Brian

    "You really did save my life tonight. I was very very close to doing something silly."


  • David

    "I thought no one could help me and I felt so desperate,
    but talking to someone was the first step to getting my life back."


  • Ian

    "The perspective offered in my lowest moments,
    gave me the strength to continue at moments when I could otherwise have given up."


  • Jenna

    "I never knew it would bring so much relief to talk to someone who cared"
  • John

    "Thank you for that information and thank you for talking to me.
    I actually feel a bit better getting it out of my system and saying how I really feel."
  • Kathy

    "I want to compliment Lifeline for the professional and caring approach. I was very impressed with the service I received yesterday.
    I'd also like to say that many years ago Lifeline literally saved my life when I was in a very dark place. Thank you."
  • Katie

    "Thanks heaps for your help, I feel calmer and a lot less like harming myself now."
  • Matt

    "I even feel better typing to you tonight - I feel like I have taken some action.
    I was a bit scared of calling; but find online chatting less scary. What a great idea."
  • Renee

    "Thank you for having such wonderful people taking time to help others."